watercolor painting Big Bend

Link Adobe Corner

This is a corner of one of the adobe farmhouses that are still standing (more or less) in Big Bend National Park. It’s the first in a projected series that has as it’s theme the contrast between the right angles and geometry of man-made structures and the shapes of the surrounding landscape. A right angle, regardless of how eroded it is, makes me think of the person who must have made it, and what it might have been like to be that person in that place. As I envision the series, they will all be based on historic structures in Big Bend.

Adobe Corner – 14 x 11 inches, watercolor on gessoed paper, $308.00

Fontaine Verte

Link Fontaine Verte

Another piece is headed for a very good home. This one is probably the most Wyeth-like of any of the little suburban landscapes, and is a particular favorite of mine.

Fontaine Verte, 8×8 inch acrylic – SOLD

gouache painting of Big Tex

Link Big Tex Says Howdy

I painted this piece specifically for the Southwest Watercolor Society’s fundraiser. When asked to contribute a painting, I was concerned that my usual non-descript subjects in quiet colors wouldn’t generate a lot of auction action. Big Tex was the answer. He kept me true to my “painting local” theme, and also fit right in with my developing interest in signage. I did liven up my usual color palette to make this a happy piece. It raised a respectable amount for the society in the auction. Thank you to the buyer! Tex will now be hanging in a gorgeous home, and I’m honored for him to be there.

Big Tex Says Howdy – gouache on paper – SOLD

Link The Gainesville State

The Southwestern Watercolor Society’s fall paintout was held in Gainesville this year. I did a few small plein air paintings and also did an on site sketch of their restored movie theater. This painting was done in the studio, using the sketch and some photographs for reference.

The making of this painting was documented as a tip on the Society’s website. If you’re interested in my painting process for these, you can read about it here.

The Gainesville State, 14×11, watercolor and gouache on gessoed paper

Link The Kilgore Texan

It seems like half of the old theaters in Texas are named “Texas” or “Texan”. There are two wonderful old theaters in Kilgore. One of them, of course, is called the Texan. I wanted to choose an angle that also showed the downtown oil rigs…and questioned that decision every time I had to repaint them.T

The Kilgore Texan – 10 x 20 inches, watercolor and gouache on paper

Link The Fort Worth Azle

So far my theater paintings have been at least partly gouache. This one, however, was done with watercolor only, using a wipe out technique. I really like working in a reductive way, so that the paint I take off is just as important as the paint I leave on.

This theater had a Zumba poster on the marquee. I’m not sure whether it is out of use or if they really hold Zumba classes inside.

Link The Garland Plaza

The Garland Plaza – 18 1/2 x 11 inches, watercolor and gouache on gessoed archival paper

Another of the theater paintings. In this one I concentrated the saturated color in a small area of the sign, and let the rest dissolve into neutrals. This theater is still in use in Garland, Texas.

Link The Daingerfield Morris

The Daingerfield Morris – 14×10 inches, watercolor and gouache on rag paper.

This is the start of a new series – old classic movie theaters. They are interesting to me for a number of reasons:

First, they are relics of a time when our community had more shared experiences than we do now; they are places where some of that sharing actually happened. The current show might have been an action film, and you might have preferred comedies, but you would go anyway because it was the entertainment being offered and everyone would be talking about it until the next show opened.

Second, I’m getting interested in signage and letterforms, and how little specific visual information is required to communicate because the shapes are so recognizable.

Third, the buildings are so highly stylized, and the ones that have not been restored have wonderful texture. When I shot the photo reference for this piece, I thought maybe the theater had been closed. However, the internet says no – they are still showing films here at the Morris.

The first theater I painted was in my sketchbook. This is actually the second one, but it is the first full size painting.

Link Faded Star

Faded Star – 21×14 inches, gouache and watercolor

I’ve neglected my website and blog even though I’ve been posting on Facebook and Instagram. It’s high time to do a little catching up.

Lately I’ve been doing some water media work where the removal of paint is just as important in the process as putting it on. Faded Star is a good example. The paper support was primed with acrylic gesso before sloshing on a combination of watercolor and gouache paints. Then portions were blotted away to create the image.  The gesso and method of applying the paint introduces more  unpredictability and encourages intuitive working.  Starting with a mess and reacting to it has always been a favorite way of working.

This old oil station is one I encountered on one of the Watercolor Society paintouts. I believe it is located in Jefferson, Texas.

Link For the Love of Art

This show at the TVAA gallery recently concluded. The work came from members of my sketch group. We showed some of the work we have done on location during our weekly get-togethers, but primarily our studio work.

Here’s a portion of the statement I wrote for this show:

For this exhibition, Robyn has chosen paintings that depict the landscape and details of infrastructure in the East Dallas neighborhood where she lives. The sources of these paintings are all located within three miles of her home.

By purposely focusing on views that are insignificant in themselves, she avoids appeals to emotion and
sentimentality. Instead, in this mundane subject matter she finds poetry of light and geometry that elicits a meditative sense of timelessness and calm.

These paintings were all created in her studio, but Robyn is also active as a plein air painter, enjoying the exercise of her observational skills by working directly from life. It was this interest in working on location that led her to the Urban Sketching movement and the friends that form her weekly sketch group.