Link White Rock Elder

White Rock Elder 1, 11.5 x 8 inches, watercolor on gessoed rag paper

Here’s another piece done with the same technique as the previous one. It’s all watercolor, even though it doesn’t look like it. It’s the acrylic ground that makes the paint behave so differently.

White Rock Lake is close to my house, and I have in mind a series on the older trees that ring it. This one is the first.

Link Faded Star

Faded Star – 21×14 inches, gouache and watercolor

I’ve neglected my website and blog even though I’ve been posting on Facebook and Instagram. It’s high time to do a little catching up.

Lately I’ve been doing some water media work where the removal of paint is just as important in the process as putting it on. Faded Star is a good example. The paper support was primed with acrylic gesso before sloshing on a combination of watercolor and gouache paints. Then portions were blotted away to create the image.  The gesso and method of applying the paint introduces more  unpredictability and encourages intuitive working.  Starting with a mess and reacting to it has always been a favorite way of working.

This old oil station is one I encountered on one of the Watercolor Society paintouts. I believe it is located in Jefferson, Texas.

Link Geisterhaus

Two more out for exhibition. Geisterhaus is another one of the “dogwalk” landscapes – scenes that are within walking distance of my house.

The second painting, “Points of Interest” is a part of the pavement series of paintings that I have slowly been working on.

I’m pleased that they were accepted into the Irving Art Association’s membership show.

Link For the Love of Art

This show at the TVAA gallery recently concluded. The work came from members of my sketch group. We showed some of the work we have done on location during our weekly get-togethers, but primarily our studio work.

Here’s a portion of the statement I wrote for this show:

For this exhibition, Robyn has chosen paintings that depict the landscape and details of infrastructure in the East Dallas neighborhood where she lives. The sources of these paintings are all located within three miles of her home.

By purposely focusing on views that are insignificant in themselves, she avoids appeals to emotion and
sentimentality. Instead, in this mundane subject matter she finds poetry of light and geometry that elicits a meditative sense of timelessness and calm.

These paintings were all created in her studio, but Robyn is also active as a plein air painter, enjoying the exercise of her observational skills by working directly from life. It was this interest in working on location that led her to the Urban Sketching movement and the friends that form her weekly sketch group.

 

 

 

Link more on Das Beschneiden

I am very honored that Das Beschneiden was juried into the Texas National by Jed Perl. This is distinguished company indeed!

Link Giardino Segreto

Here is another landscape detail from our alley. This is not our own gas meter; it is one from a few houses down that was looking particularly fetching on the day. It reminded me of one of the Imperial war machines from the Star Wars movies, and I liked the contrast between the clunky machinery and the tangle of green at the base.

Giardino Segreto – Watercolor, 10×8 – NFS

Link Invito

In the month of February I will be in a group show with many of my sketching buddies. It’s being held at the TVAA gallery, 700 N. Pearl, in Dallas. If you happen to be in the area, I would love to see you at the reception on Feb. 3, 2-4.

 

All of the pieces I will be showing are scenes or details from my neighborhood. Nothing is more than three miles from my house, and most of the subjects were found when I was walking the dog…so they are very close to home.

This watercolor is one of them. I loved the way the prickly pear on this house’s front step melted into the shadows, and the way the shadows of the corner, overhang, and hedge all merged to form one shape.

Invito – 8×8 inch watercolor – NFS

Link 30×30 results

Last blog post I was planning a personal 30×30 challenge and here are the results. The intent was to experiment with watermedia every day, and I did a little of that, but mostly I ended up with studies for things I intend to paint again in a more considered way – those are the suburban landscapes.

The ones that are more experimental are numbers 11, 12, 15, 16, 17, and 19. There is a lot to consider in them about what worked, what didn’t, and why. Experiments are heaps of fun because they are done purely for the experience. If they end up being worth presentation, that is a rare bonus. Usually they suffer from “too muchness”. Too bright, too design-y, too incoherent, too unresolved. However, they are excellent dress rehearsals for do-overs that can take me in a bit of a different direction.

I always struggle with color because I always seem to end up going overboard even though I want to keep the color subtle. #18 and #23 are the closest to the way I want to use color right now. I’m glad that a few got close to the mark!

Number 10 has about the right amount of looseness. That is another difficult target.

There were a couple of do-overs within the 30 because I just couldn’t walk away from a motif when I missed the mark. And the one figure piece because that was the only watermedia I had worked on that day. It was included even though it didn’t really fit with the rest. Even the food court still life has more in common with the landscapes than the figure.

Putting them all together like this really helps in evaluating the individual pieces. I have got to get a wall in the studio fixed up soon so that I can view things side by side in real life!

Link 30×30

Tomorrow I am going to start another 30 paintings in 30 days challenge. I’ve played along on a couple of these in the past, when another artist has announced a challenge and invited other people to participate. They were both really good experiences that advanced my work, and I’m glad I did them. The last one was in November of 2016, so it was almost a year ago.

So lately I have been in a bit of a rut and thought I would give myself a personal challenge. The parameters are pretty broad – the paintings just need to be watermedia. Watercolor, gouache, acrylic, ink, mixed media, whatever.

To get a little jump start, I’ve prepared some paper and panel supports. I really like starting with a surface that already has some color or marks on it for several reasons:

…I paint more loosely than when I start with a pristine white surface. This is probably related to the blank page paralysis that many people experience.

…a base tone with some texture to it gives me something to react to.

…colored paper for midtones with dark and white chalks is a classic drawing technique and a way of thinking that helps me organize my compositions.

I’m excited to get started. I have some new materials and heaps of ideas to try during the 30 days.

Link from the mundane to the specific

Thanks to curator Henry Biber for including three of my paintings in the current exhibit at the TVAA gallery, From the Mundane to the Specific. From his prospectus:

” Make the revisioning of commonplace objects worthy of display on a wall or a pedestal. A broken pot, worn old boots, antique dinnerware, the frayed arm of a chair, or a rusty part of a disassembled yard tool for example, can transform into something at home in a sphere beyond the ordinary. “

A show right down my alley, literally. The featured image above is called Le Printemps, and the subject is my alley on trash day. Wait is the graphic painting of parking lot pavement and striping. Fontaine Rose is the suburban landscape with the pink hose.
The show runs through the 28th of September,  at

TVAA Downtown Gallery
Plaza of the Americas – Suite G-207
700 N Pearl,
Dallas, Texas 75201

On to the navel-gazing portion of the post. A friend recently remarked that she thought I took ordinary things and made them beautiful. I’m pleased that she thinks that my paintings are beautiful, but I am not consciously trying to prettify the mundane. What I am doing is paying attention to my surroundings and finding the classical and harmonious qualities that exist in them. This might be a subtle distinction, but it is an important one to me.